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Poker News | People in Poker | Poker Superstars

The Round Table – David Singer Can’t Let Go

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The winner of the first ever $10,000 Caesars tournament shares his thoughts on the win, thoughts on his losses and shares how he can’t seem to forget about hands he misplays.

KL: What have you been up to lately?

David:
Playing tournaments, trying to enjoy life. I haven’t been playing that much poker lately. I live in Vegas and I have been trying to spend more time with my son who is turning five in February.

KL: So you don’t play that much but you just pop in and win a tournament?

David:
[laughs] I won the tournament in October and I just finished second in the Venetian where I was very disappointed, I was hoping to win. I had Allen Cunningham all in a bunch of times, it was the most disappointed I have been after any poker tournament. Besides that I have played six or seven tournaments in the last two weeks and I don’t think I have made one dinner break.

KL: What was the Caesars tournament like for you? Was it up, up, up or were there swings?

David:
It’s never easy but mostly I went up pretty steadily. At the beginning I started off slowly. I wasn’t doing well at the beginning but then I steadily went up during the second day. Near the end of the second day I was one of the chip leaders and then I went card dead for awhile and hung in. I went to the final table as one of the short stacks and it was a pretty tough final table. It wasn’t any of the huge names of poker in it but there were five or six players that made up a tough final table. I feel like I played really well.

The final hand I got lucky on, Kiddo Pham is a very tough opponent to read and I misread him which is bad because I purposefully tried to play small pots with him and in a really big pot I got it in bad! Anyway I was fortunate to win the hand and overall I played really well at the final table. I feel like I played better than anyone else. I was lucky on the final hand and I’m pretty sure of the whole tournament that was the only hand where I got the money in bad and was lucky. I was playing on a really high level at the final table where I was outthinking my opponents, being aggressive, stealing pots from them, getting away from hands when I thought I was behind. It was really rewarding to win, it was my first $10,000 event that I have won and I was super happy and super excited.

KL: Did you go splurge or go buy anything crazy after you won?

David:
[laughs] No, I bought something silly for a hundred dollars! I bought a little Plexiglas cube with a picture of me and my girlfriend for like a hundred. That was it, just this little holographic picture. It was so cheesy but I just thought it was funny. That was my big splurge!

KL: You played in the first ever $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. and finished sixth. You then came back the next year and finished sixth again. Was that frustrating for you or were you happy to have made two final tables in the event?

David:
I played in the first H.O.R.S.E. event and sixth was disappointing, I felt like I had a decent chance to win. There were a lot of great players in the event, some of them I even think their best game is no limit. I doubled up or nearly doubled up in one of the early hands against Doyle Brunson so I was in second place, but then and I’m not using this as an excuse it’s just a fact, I was really fatigued. Rio managed this tournament really bad, we played 19 hours the day before the final table and then I got about an hour of sleep because I was keyed up so I couldn’t sleep. They made us come back pretty early and I was in a fog for some of it.

I played one hand terribly against Andy Bloch where I should have reraised him before the flop and taken the hand down. If not, I never should have lost the chips that I did in the hand. I played that hand so badly and I didn’t realize for three or four hours how badly I played it. That’s how tired I was. I think I had a really good opportunity there so it was disappointing.

This year I finished sixth and I kind of had bad luck right before we got down to the final table. We were playing shorthanded stud at a table, four or five handed, with two guys who played very badly in stud games and I was trying to ante and get the hands going as quickly as possible to play a lot of stud hands with them and they ended up beating me in every stud hand, which was very unfortunate. A lot of times I had the best hand and they would draw out on me. I just had bad luck at the wrong time. I am proud of the fact that I am the only person to have made two final tables in the event, not that I think that makes me the best H.O.R.S.E. player in the world, but I feel good about the fact that I mostly played really well and my concentration was at a high level.

KL: You seemed distraught about that hand against Andy Bloch still; do you often go back and agonize over hands that you think you misplayed?

David:
Yeah, I hold on to it too long. In general, even outside of poker, I am very hard on myself, much harder than I am on anyone else. I try not to get mad at myself about that hand in the H.O.R.S.E. event because I know I wouldn’t have normally done that it was just because I was so fatigued I didn’t think about the hand right. Andy Bloch raised with a small ace on the button and he had been raising almost every hand and I had either Q-J or K-J in the big blind and I should have reraised and won the hand right there. If I didn’t win the hand there I shouldn’t have lost all the chips I did on it. There are other hands that I get annoyed at myself about, some playing against Allen Cunningham at the Venetian. I guess it would be better if I wasn’t bothered by it, a lot of people aren’t but it does bother me. I have to try and think of what I can take from it rather than being hard on myself. I think about it, I’m not going to tell you I don’t.

KL: What are you up to when you are agonizing over hands?

David:
In my free time I like to play on Full Tilt Poker, I try and play all limits. Sometimes I play free money, sometimes I play small sit-n-go’s late at night, it’s a lot of fun to talk to the people on there. They have interesting stories about how they are playing, or they want some advice on poker.

Also, I wanted to mention, if you want to do something good or give money to a good cause go to akuproject.org. It is a charity that my cousins are involved in that I do a little work for to bring a learning center and clean water to a small village in Africa called Aku in Nigeria. The reason I am involved in it is my cousins, when they were school age, they had an exchange student come from that village and live with them and he went on to be a doctor. He is trying to give something back to his community so he has people in Nigeria working for nothing and they are just trying to do some good for the village.

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